Harless Tax Blog

Harless Tax Blog

Several tax law changes may affect bottom line of many business owners

Friday, October 19, 2018

Source from irs.gov
WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today reminded business owners that tax reform legislation passed last December affects nearly every business.

With just a few months left in the year, the IRS is highlighting important information for small businesses and self-employed individuals to help them understand and meet their tax obligations. See More

IRS issues guidance on Tax Cuts and Jobs Act changes on business expense

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Source from irs.gov
WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service issued guidance today on the business expense deduction for meals and entertainment following law changes in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA).

The 2017 TCJA eliminated the deduction for any expenses related to activities generally considered entertainment, amusement or recreation.

Taxpayers may continue to deduct 50 percent of the cost of business meals if the taxpayer (or an employee of the taxpayer) is present and the food or beverages are not considered lavish or extravagant. The meals may be provided to a current or potential business customer, client, consultant or similar business contact.  See More

Tax facts for seasonal job seekers

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Source from irs.gov
Small business owners and self-employed taxpayers often get seasonal jobs to earn extra spending money or to save for later. But many don't realize that they need to report income from a part-time or temporary job to the IRS.

The IRS offers this fact sheet for those working seasonal jobs and other part-time employment to help them correctly file and pay their taxes. See also:

Tax Reform
Publication 505, Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax
Understanding Employment Tax  See More

IRS launches new easy-to-use webpages on tax reform

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

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Clarification for business taxpayers: Payments under state or local tax credit programs may be deductible as business expenses

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Source from irs.gov
WASHINGTON — Business taxpayers who make business-related payments to charities or government entities for which the taxpayers receive state or local tax credits can generally deduct the payments as business expenses, the Internal Revenue Service said today.

Responding to taxpayer inquiries, the IRS clarified that this general deductibility rule is unaffected by the recent notice of proposed rulemaking concerning the availability of a charitable contribution deduction for contributions pursuant to such programs. The business expense deduction is available to any business taxpayer, regardless of whether it is doing business as a sole proprietor, partnership or corporation, as long as the payment qualifies as an ordinary and necessary business expense. Therefore, businesses generally can still deduct business-related payments in full as a business expense on their federal income tax return.  See More

An estimated tax payment in 2018 could help avoid a penalty in 2019

Monday, September 17, 2018

Source from irs.gov
Taxes must be paid as you earn or receive income during the year, either through withholding, estimated tax payments or a combination of both. A Paycheck Checkup using the IRS Withholding Calculator can help you see if you need to make an additional payment to avoid an unexpected tax bill or underpayment penalty when you file your tax return next year.

You may need to make estimated payments if you:

— have multiple jobs—especially if you don’t have each employer withhold taxes
— are self-employed or an independent contractor
— are a representative of a direct-sales or in-home-sales company
— participate in sharing economy activities where you are not working as an employee
— receive pension income

IRS.gov to learn more. See More

Best Deductions For a Small Business for Tax Season

Monday, April 10, 2017

Source: inc.com
Tax season can be one of the most stressful times of the year for business owners. However, it's necessary if you want to avoid audits or getting penalized by the IRS.

But, tax season is also beneficial for business owners since it can help you deduct certain expenses, which means that you can reduce your overall tax burden.

To make sure that you don't leave any money on the table, here are the best deductions for small businesses to write-off this upcoming tax season.  See More

Playing Defense as Stock Prices Soar Part 2 of 2

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

As a follow up to our last blog post, Playing Defense as Stock Prices Soar, here are some additional strategies to consider.

Individual circumstances
All of these strategies have advantages and drawbacks, so you should proceed with caution. Very generally, buy and hold strategies might appeal to workers who are some years from retirement. A market drop may turn out to be a buying opportunity, especially for those who are investing periodically through contributions to 401(k) and similar plans. On the other hand, trimming stocks might be prudent for people in or near retirement. Investment opportunities at low stock prices may be reduced, and a market skid can be particularly dangerous for retirees who are tapping their portfolio for spending money.  See More

TAX DEADLINE REMINDERS, MARCH 15

Friday, March 10, 2017

Partnerships. File a 2016 calendar-year return (Form 1065). Provide each partner with a copy of Schedule K-1 (Form 1065), Partner’s Share of Income, Deductions, Credits, etc., or a substitute Schedule K-1. If you want an automatic six-month extension of time to file the return and provide Schedule K-1 or a substitute Schedule K-1, file Form 7004. Then file Form 1065 by September 15.

S corporations. File a 2016 calendar-year income tax return (Form 1120S) and pay any tax due. Provide each shareholder with a copy of Schedule K-1 (Form 1120S), Shareholder's Share of Income, Deductions, Credits, etc., or a substitute Schedule K-1. If you want an automatic six-month extension of time to file the return, file Form 7004 and deposit what you estimate you owe.  See More

Profit-Sharing Plans for Your Small Business

Friday, February 10, 2017

Business owners who want to sponsor a retirement plan for employees (including owner-employees) have many options from which to choose. Knowing the basics can help entrepreneurs make an astute decision.

One choice is a “profit-sharing” plan. Despite its name, your company needn’t tabulate its earnings every year and divide that amount among its workers. Instead, the term indicates a plan in which contributions to employees’ retirement accounts are made by the employer. Therefore, a profit-sharing plan may help your company to attract, motivate, and retain valued employees. These plans are flexible, so employers can contribute more in good years and less (or nothing at all) when business is slow.  See More