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Coronavirus stimulus prepaid cards mailed in plain envelopes are not junk mail, IRS cautions 'Please do not throw it away,' government pleads

Monday, June 01, 2020

Original Article by Fox News >

The IRS is in the process of sending out about 4 million economic impact payments loaded onto prepaid debit cards – but Americans may not recognize the stimulus cash when they see it.

The cards will arrive in a “plain envelope” from "Money Network Cardholder Services," the IRS said.

Unsuspecting individuals could mistake the envelope for junk mail or even a credit card promotion, especially since many people are likely not aware their payment will be arriving on a prepaid card instead of in the form of a check.

People cannot choose to have their payments sent this way. These 4 million individuals, who did not have direct deposit information on file with the tax agency, were selected by the Bureau of the Fiscal Service.

The Visa name appears on the front of the card, and MetaBank – the Treasury Department’s financial agent – appears on the bank. That may further confuse individuals who do not hold an account with Visa and who are unfamiliar with MetaBank.

“If you receive a card that looks like this, please do not throw it away,” the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau requested in an informational web video.

One sign you may have missed your card in the mail is if you receive a letter from the IRS, signed by President Trump, which details how much money you should have received.

These letters were expected to be sent two weeks after the economic impact payments.

So what should you do if you think you may have mistaken your prepaid card for junk mail?

One way you might want to address the issue is by calling the number at the bottom of the IRS letter, 800- 919-9835. The agency has recalled some staff who will be available to take phone calls.

Further, if you believe you threw the card away or misplaced it, you can also follow directions specifically for the prepaid cards, which will allow you to block unauthorized transactions as well.

The government provides information for people whose card is lost or stolen, which directs them to log in at EIPCard.com to block unauthorized transactions and call 1-800-240-8100 to report it.

A spokesperson for the IRS directed FOX Business to the aforementioned web page for the cards, adding that the agency had nothing further to add at this time regarding what taxpayers should do if they think they may have accidentally trashed their payment.

Economic Impact Payments being sent by prepaid debit cards, arrive in plain envelope; IRS.gov answers frequently asked questions

Friday, May 29, 2020

IR-2020-105, May 27, 2020 Article from IRS.gov >

WASHINGTON – As Economic Impact Payments continue to be successfully delivered, the Internal Revenue Service today reminds taxpayers that some payments are being sent by prepaid debit card. The debit cards arrive in a plain envelope from "Money Network Cardholder Services."

Nearly 4 million people are being sent their Economic Impact Payment by prepaid debit card, instead of paper check. The determination of which taxpayers received a debit card was made by the Bureau of the Fiscal Service, a part of the Treasury Department that works with the IRS to handle distribution of the payments.

Those who receive their Economic Impact Payment by prepaid debit card can do the following without any fees.

  • Make purchases online and at any retail location where Visa is accepted
  • Get cash from in-network ATMs
  • Transfer funds to their personal bank account
  • Check their card balance online, by mobile app or by phone

This free, prepaid card also provides consumer protections available to traditional bank account owners, including protection against fraud, loss and other errors.

Frequently asked questions continually updated on IRS.gov

The IRS has two sets of frequently asked questions to help Americans get answers about their Economic Impact Payments, including those arriving on prepaid debit card. These FAQs include answers to eligibility and other many common questions, including help to use two Economic Impact Payment tools.

Get My Payment, an IRS online tool, shows the projected date when a direct deposit has been scheduled or date when the payment will be mailed by check or prepaid debit card. The Non-Filers Enter Payment Info Here tool helps taxpayers successfully submit basic information to receive Economic Impact Payments quickly.

The IRS regularly updates the Economic Impact Payment and the Get My Payment frequently asked questions pages on IRS.gov as more information becomes available. Taxpayers should check the FAQs often for the latest additions.

Here are answers to some of the top questions people are asking about the prepaid debit cards:

Can I have my economic impact payment sent to my prepaid debit card?

Maybe. It depends on your prepaid card and whether your payment has already been scheduled. Many reloadable prepaid cards have account and routing numbers that you could provide to the IRS through the Get My Payment application or Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info Here tool. You would need to check with the financial institution to ensure your card can be re-used and to obtain the routing number and account number, which may be different from the card number. If you obtained your prepaid debit card through the filing of a federal tax return, you must contact the financial institution that issued your prepaid debit card to get the correct routing number and account number. Do not use the routing number and account number shown on your copy of the tax return filed. When providing this information to the IRS, you should indicate that the account and routing number provided are for a checking account unless your financial institution indicates otherwise.

Will IRS be sending prepaid debit cards?

Some payments may be sent on a prepaid debit card known as The Economic Impact Payment Card The Economic Impact Payment Card is sponsored by the Treasury Department's Bureau of the Fiscal Service, managed by Money Network Financial, LLC and issued by Treasury's financial agent, MetaBank®, N.A.

If you receive an Economic Impact Payment Card, it will arrive in a plain envelope from "Money Network Cardholder Services." The Visa name will appear on the front of the Card; the back of the Card has the name of the issuing bank, MetaBank®, N.A. Information included with the Card will explain that the card is your Economic Impact Payment Card. Please go to EIPcard.com for more information.

Can I specifically ask the IRS to send the Economic Impact Payment to me as a debit card?

Not at this time. For those who don't receive their Economic Impact Payment by direct deposit, they will receive their payment by paper check, and, in a few cases, by debit card. The determination of which taxpayers receive a debit card will be made by the Bureau of the Fiscal Service (BFS), another part of the Treasury Department that works with the IRS to handle distribution of the payments. BFS is sending nearly 4 million debit cards to taxpayers starting in mid-May. At this time, taxpayers cannot make a selection to receive a debit card. Please go to EIPcard.com for more information.

Watch out for scams related to Economic Impact Payments

The IRS urges taxpayers to be on the lookout for scams related to the Economic Impact Payments. To use the new app or get information, taxpayers should visit IRS.gov. People should watch out for scams using email, phone calls or texts related to the payments. Be careful and cautious: The IRS will not send unsolicited electronic communications asking people to open attachments, visit a website or share personal or financial information. Remember, go directly and solely to IRS.gov for official information.

Quick links to the Frequently Asked Questions on IRS.gov:

Forgiven PPP Loans and the Deductibility of Expenses Paid

Friday, May 29, 2020

Article provided by Armanino.com >

Summary

  • While most states have yet to comment on whether taxpayers can deduct ordinary business expenses paid with Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan proceeds that are forgiven by the IRS, taxpayers should monitor state conformity to the CARES Act (P.L. 116-136) and the Internal Revenue Code.
  • Rolling conformity states that conform to the CARES Act will not tax or include as gross income any forgiveness amount associated with the PPP. As such, it is likely that these states will also follow the federal treatment that disallows expense deductions associated with any forgiven PPP loan amount.
  • Taxpayers should also be aware of the introduction of measure S.3612, which seeks to establish that coronavirus assistance, whether forgiven or repayable, will not affect the treatment of ordinary business expenses.

PPP Expense Deductions

Federal Treatment

As a part of the CARES Act (Sec. 1102), the Small Business Administration (SBA) made available PPP loans, for the purpose of helping businesses keep their workforce employed during the COVID-19 pandemic. The SBA would not require repayment of the loan if a business kept employees on its payroll for eight weeks and used the loan money for payroll, rent, mortgage interest, or utilities, with 75% of the loan amount forgiven being used for payroll. While loans that are forgiven would normally be considered cancellation of debt income, the CARES Act specifically states in Sec. 1106(i) that any forgiven loan amount will be excluded from gross income.

The IRS has issued Notice 2020-32 to provide guidance regarding the deductibility for federal income tax purposes of certain otherwise deductible expenses incurred in a taxpayer’s business when the taxpayer receives a PPP loan. Notice 2020-32 states that “no deduction is allowed under the Internal Revenue Code (Code) for an expense that is otherwise deductible if the payment of the expense results in forgiveness of a covered loan pursuant to section 1106(b) of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), Public Law 116-136, 134 Stat. 281, 286-93 (March 27, 2020) and the income associated with the forgiveness is excluded from gross income for purposes of the Code pursuant to section 1106(i) of the CARES Act.”

Therefore, currently, to the extent that any PPP loan is forgiven and excluded from a taxpayer’s gross income, the taxpayer will not be entitled to deduct ordinary and business expenses that were paid by the forgiven loan proceeds.

State Treatment

Most states have been silent in regards to whether they conform to the CARES Act and follow the federal treatment of excluding forgiven loan proceeds as gross income and disallowing expense deductions associated with PPP loan proceeds. However, it is likely that rolling conformity states that automatically conform to the IRC, such as Massachusetts or New Jersey, will conform to the CARES Act and will also follow the federal treatment of excluding forgiven PPP loans from gross income and disallowing expense deductions associated with any forgiven PPP loan amount.

However, states that have static conformity provisions that do not conform to the CARES Act, such as California (conforms to the IRC as of January 1, 2015), will likely not follow the federal treatment regarding forgiven PPP loan proceeds and related expenses. In these non-conforming states, any forgiven loan proceeds will likely be included as income for state purposes. States that do include forgiven PPP loan proceeds as income will likely allow expense deductions for ordinary expenses funded by the PPP loans.

Small Business Expense Protection Act of 2020 (S. 3612)

On May 5, 2020, the Small Business Expense Protection Act of 2020 (S. 3612) was introduced to the Senate. This bipartisan legislation clarifies that ordinary expenses that are backed by PPP loan proceeds will be deductible as normal ordinary expenses. This bill, if passed, will reverse the federal treatment of disallowing ordinary expense deductions that are funded by PPP amounts as stated in Notice 2020-32.

The lawmakers that introduced S.3612 believe its passage is necessary to achieve the PPP’s true goal of providing relief to small businesses affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Specifically, the lawmakers stated that, “Providing assistance to small businesses, only to disallow their business deductions as provided in Notice 2020-32, reverses the benefit that Congress specifically granted by exempting PPP loan forgiveness from income.”

If S.3612 is to become law, a rolling conformity analysis will likely not need to be conducted in order to determine if states will allow expense deductions funded by PPP loan proceeds, as federal preemption will require states to allow for the deduction. Currently S.3612 has been introduced to the Senate and assigned to the Senate Committee on Finance. The next step is for the Committee to send the bill to the Senate floor for debate or a subcommittee for further research. If it does go to the Senate floor and receives a majority vote, the bill will move to the House of Representatives for a similar process of committees, debate and voting. Once both houses approve the final bill, it will go to the President for signature or veto.

For specific guidance regarding state-specific treatment pertaining to the PPP and related expenses, see Armanino’s COVID-19 Relief Matrix.

Insights

Taxpayers who have received PPP loans and satisfied the conditions necessary to result in partial or full forgiveness of the loan amount must determine whether they are able to deduct the ordinary business expenses that they paid with their PPP loan proceeds. Absent any specific comment from the states regarding these expense deductions, a conformity analysis should be done to determine whether a state conforms to the CARES Act and the IRC generally.

If a state conforms to the CARES Act, the states will follow the current federal treatment to exclude any forgiven PPP amount from gross income and disallow any deduction for any associated expenses. While the federal treatment currently disallows PPP expense deductions associated with forgiven loan amounts, new measures and proposals will likely result in expense deductions associated with PPP being allowed at a later time.

Also keep an eye on S. 3612 to see whether it becomes law and thereby allows taxpayers to take the ordinary expense deductions paid for by PPP loans. This bill is just in the first stage of the legislative process – so stay tuned!

Proposed Changes to PPP Program Pass First Congressional Hurdle

Friday, May 29, 2020

Article provided by Armanino.com >

The House passed the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) Flexibility Act (HR 7010) on May 28th with an overwhelming bipartisan vote. The Bill was sponsored by Rep. Chip Roy (R-TX) and included a few key changes:

  • Extending loan repayment period from 2 to 5 years;
  • Extending the Covered Period to 24 weeks or December 31, 2020 (which means any loan funded by July 17, 2020);
  • Revising the percentage of forgivable spend on non-payroll costs; and
  • Allowing payroll tax deferrals even with loan forgiveness.

It is important to note that passage of the law in the House does not mean these changes have become the law. Ultimately, the Senate will need to take up the matter, approve it and forward to the President for signature. Until those steps are taken, the PPP program and guidance remain unchanged despite the House bill.

The Senate is currently considering several bills to amend PPP, so the details of what, if anything, ultimately gets signed into law may change.

In addition, the House generally voted along party lines against the Public Disclosure of COVID Recovery Loans (Truth Act, HR 6782) that would have required the SBA to publish significant identifying information about borrowers and lenders.

We continue to monitor the ongoing PPP legislative proposals and will provide updates as they arise.

IRS adds phone operators to answer Economic Impact Payment questions

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

IR-2020-97, May 18, 2020 From IRS.gov >

WASHINGTON — Today, the Internal Revenue Service is starting to add 3,500 telephone representatives to answer some of the most common questions about Economic Impact Payments.

IRS telephone assistance and other services will remain limited, and answers for most of the common questions related to Economic Impact Payments are available on IRS.gov. The IRS anticipates bringing back additional assistors as state and local advisories permit.

Answers for most Economic Impact Payment questions are available on the automated message for people who call the phone number provided in the letter (Notice 1444). Those who need additional assistance at the conclusion of the message will have the option of talking to a telephone representative.

Americans are encouraged to use IRS.gov

The IRS regularly posts new and updated answers to the most frequently asked questions about Economic Impact Payments and the Get My Payment tool. Those who wish to know the status of their Economic Impact Payment are reminded to check Get My Payment regularly; the information is frequently updated as the IRS continues to process the remaining payments for delivery.

For those who are eligible for an Economic Impact Payment but aren't required to file a tax return, the IRS reminds them the Non-Filers tool also remains available in English or Spanish for them to register for a payment.

IRS People First Initiative provides relief to taxpayers facing COVID-19 issues

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Tax Tip 2020-56, May 13, 2020 From IRS.gov >

Due to COVID-19, the IRS' People First Initiative provides relief to taxpayers on a variety of issues from easing payment guidelines to delaying compliance actions. This relief is effective through the filing and payment deadline, Wednesday, July 15, 2020.

  • Existing Installment Agreements –Under an existing Installment Agreement, payments due between April 1 and July 15, 2020 are delayed. Those currently unable to meet the terms of an Installment Payment Agreement or Direct Deposit Installment Agreement may cancel payments during this period with no default. By law, interest will continue to accumulate on any unpaid balances.
  • New Installment Agreements – People who can't pay all their federal taxes can establish a monthly payment agreement.
  • Pending Offer in Compromise applications – Taxpayers have until July 15, 2020, to provide additional information for a pending OIC. The agency generally won't close any pending OIC request before July 15 without the taxpayer's consent.
  • OIC payments – Taxpayers can delay all payments on accepted OICs until July 15, 2020. Interest may accrue, and missed payments are due when the suspension period ends. Taxpayers can call the number on their acceptance letter to address their needs.
  • Delinquent return filings – The IRS will not default an OIC for taxpayers who are delinquent in filing their tax return for 2018. However, they should file any delinquent 2018 return and their 2019 return by July 15, 2020.
  • Non-filers – More than 1 million households who haven't filed tax returns in the last three years are owed refunds. The deadline to get refunds on 2016 tax returns is July 15, 2020. Those who owe taxes on delinquent returns may visit IRS.gov for payment options. The longer the debt is owed, the more penalties and interest accrue.
  • Field collection activities – IRS stopped field revenue officer enforcement actions, such as liens and levies. Revenue officers will continue to pursue high-income non-filers and perform other similar activities where necessary.
  • Automated liens and levies – IRS delayed issuing new automated and systemic liens and levies. Taxpayers experiencing a hardship due to a levy should reach out to their assigned IRS contact or fax their information to 855-796-4524.
  • Certifications to the State Department – IRS has delayed new certifications of taxpayers who are considered seriously delinquent. This affects a person's ability to receive a new or renewed passport. Existing certifications will remain in place unless their tax situation changes.
  • Private debt collection – IRS will not forward new delinquent accounts to private collection agencies during this period.

What people really want to know about Economic Impact Payments

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

May 12, 2020 From IRS.gov >

IRS.gov has answers to many questions people may have about their Economic Impact Payment. Here are answers to some of the top questions people are asking about these payments.

Is this payment considered taxable income?

No, the payment is not income and taxpayers will not owe tax on it. The payment will not reduce a taxpayer's refund or increase the amount they owe when they file their 2020 tax return next year. A payment also will not affect income for purposes of determining eligibility for federal government assistance or benefit programs.

Can people who receive a Form SSA-1099 or RRB-1099 use Get My Payment to check their payment status?

Yes, they will be able to use Get My Payment to check the status of their payment after verifying their identity by answering the required security questions.

If someone's bank account information has changed since they filed their last tax return, can they update it using Get My Payment?

To help protect against potential fraud, the tool also does not allow people to change direct deposit bank account information already on file with the IRS.

If the IRS issues a direct deposit based on the account information that the taxpayer provided on their tax return and the bank information is now invalid or the account has been closed, the bank will reject the deposit. The agency will then mail payment as soon as possible to the address they have on file. Get My Payment will be updated to reflect the date a payment will be mailed. It will take up to 14 days to receive the payment, standard mailing time.

Where can people get more information?

Taxpayers who are required to file a tax return, can go to IRS Free File to file electronically. If they aren't required to file, they should go to the Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info Here tool and submit their information to receive an Economic Impact Payment.

For the complete lists of FAQs, visit the Economic Impact Payment and the Get My Payment tool pages on IRS.gov. The IRS updates these FAQs regularly.

The IRS encourages people to share this information with family and friends.

Why the Economic Impact Payment amount could be different than anticipated

Monday, May 11, 2020

May 11, 2020 From IRS.gov >

WASHINGTON — The IRS and Treasury have successfully delivered nearly 130 million Economic Impact Payments to Americans in less than a month, and more are on the way. Some Americans may have received a payment amount different than what they expected. Payment amounts vary based on income, filing status and family size.

See below for some common scenarios that may explain why you received a different payment amount than expected:

You have not filed a 2019 tax return, or the IRS has not finished processing your 2019 return

Payments are automatic for eligible people who filed a tax return for 2018 or 2019. Typically, the IRS uses information from the 2019 tax return to calculate the Economic Impact Payment. Instead, the IRS will use the 2018 return if the taxpayer has not yet filed for 2019. If a taxpayer has already filed for 2019, the agency will still use the 2018 return if the IRS has not finished processing the 2019 return. Remember, the IRS accepting a tax return electronically is different than completing processing; any issues with the 2019 return mean the IRS would've used the 2018 filing.

If the IRS used the 2018 return, various life changes in 2019 would not be reflected in the payment. These may include higher or lower income or birth or adoption of a child.

In many cases, however, these taxpayers may be able to claim an additional amount on the 2020 tax return they file next year. This could include up to an additional $500 for each qualifying child not reflected in their Economic Impact Payment.

Claimed dependents are not eligible for an additional $500 payment

Only children eligible for the Child Tax Credit qualify for the additional payment of up to $500 per child. To claim the Child Tax Credit, the taxpayer generally must be related to the child, live with them more than half the year and provide at least half of their support. Besides their own children, adopted children and foster children, eligible children can include the taxpayer's younger siblings, grandchildren, nieces and nephews if they can be claimed as dependents. In addition, any qualifying child must be a U.S. citizen, permanent resident or other qualifying resident alien. The child must also be under the age of 17 at the end of the year for the tax return on which the IRS bases the payment determination.

A qualifying child must have a valid Social Security number (SSN) or an Adoption Taxpayer Identification Number (ATIN). A child with an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) is not eligible for an additional payment.

Parents who are not married to each other and do not file a joint return cannot both claim their qualifying child as a dependent. The parent who claimed their child on their 2019 return may have received an additional Economic Impact Payment for their qualifying child. When the parent who did not receive an additional payment files their 2020 tax return next year, they may be able to claim up to an additional $500 per-child amount on that return if they qualify to claim the child as their qualifying child for 2020.

Dependents are college students

Pursuant to the CARES Act, dependent college students do not qualify for an EIP, and even though their parents may claim them as dependents, they normally do not qualify for the additional $500 payment. For example, under the law, a 20-year-old full-time college student claimed as a dependent on their mother's 2019 federal income tax return is not eligible for a $1,200 Economic Impact Payment. In addition, the student's mother will not receive an additional $500 Economic Impact Payment for the student because they do not qualify as a child younger than 17. This scenario could also apply if a parent's 2019 tax return hasn't been processed yet by the IRS before the payments were calculated, and a college student was claimed on a 2018 tax return.

However, if the student cannot be claimed as a dependent by their mother or anyone else for 2020, that student may be eligible to claim a $1,200 credit on their 2020 tax return next year.

Claimed dependents are parents or relatives, age 17 or older

If a dependent is 17 or older, they do not qualify the additional $500. If a taxpayer claimed a parent or any other relative age 17 or older on their tax return, that dependent will not receive a $1,200 payment. In addition, the taxpayer will not receive an additional $500 payment because the parent or other relative is not a qualifying child under age 17.

However, if the parent or other relative cannot be claimed as a dependent on the taxpayer's or anyone else's return for 2020, the parent or relative may be eligible to individually claim a $1,200 credit on their 2020 tax return filed next year.

Past-due child support was deducted from the payment

The Economic Impact Payment is offset only by past-due child support. The Bureau of the Fiscal Service will send the taxpayer a notice if an offset occurs.

For taxpayers who are married filing jointly and filed an injured spouse claim with their 2019 tax return (or 2018 tax return if they haven't filed the 2019 tax return), half of the total payment will be sent to each spouse. Only the payment of the spouse who owes past-due child support should be offset.

The IRS is aware that a portion of the payment sent to a spouse who filed an injured spouse claim with his or her 2019 tax return (or 2018 tax return if no 2019 tax return has been filed) may have been offset by the injured spouse's past-due child support. The IRS is working with the Bureau of Fiscal Service and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Support Enforcement, to resolve this issue as quickly as possible. If you filed an injured spouse claim with your return and are impacted by this issue, you do not need to take any action. The injured spouse will receive their unpaid half of the total payment when the issue is resolved. We apologize for the inconvenience this may have caused.

Garnishments by creditors reduced the payment amount

Federal tax refunds, including the Economic Impact Payment, are not protected from garnishment by creditors by federal law once the proceeds are deposited into a taxpayer's bank account.

What if the amount of my Economic Impact Payment is incorrect?

Everyone should review the eligibility requirements for their family to make sure they meet the criteria.

In many instances, eligible taxpayers who received a smaller-than-expected Economic Impact Payment (EIP) may qualify to receive an additional amount early next year when they file their 2020 federal income tax return. EIPs are technically an advance payment of a new temporary tax credit that eligible taxpayers can claim on their 2020 return. Everyone should keep for their records the letter they receive by mail within a few weeks after their payment is issued.

When taxpayers file their return next year, they can claim additional credits on their 2020 tax return if they are eligible for them. The IRS will provide further details on IRS.gov on the action they may need to take.

The EIP will not reduce a taxpayer's refund or increase the amount they owe when they file a tax return early next year. It is also not taxable and is therefore should not be included in income on a 2020 return.

Act by Wednesday for chance to get quicker Economic Impact Payment; timeline for payments continues to accelerate

Monday, May 11, 2020

May 8, 2020 From IRS.gov >

WASHINGTON – With a variety of steps underway to speed Economic Impact Payments, the Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service urged people to use Get My Payment by noon Wednesday, May 13, for a chance to get a quicker delivery.

The IRS, working in partnership with Treasury Department and the Bureau of Fiscal Services (BFS), continues to accelerate work to get Economic Impact Payments to even more people as soon as possible. Approximately 130 million individuals have already received payments worth more than $200 billion in the program's first four weeks.

Starting later this month, the number of paper checks being delivered to taxpayers will sharply increase. For many taxpayers, the last chance to obtain a direct deposit of their Economic Impact Payment rather than receive a paper check is coming soon. People should visit Get My Payment on IRS.gov by noon Wednesday, May 13, to check on their payment status and, when available, provide their direct deposit information.

"We're working hard to get more payments quickly to taxpayers," said IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig. "We want people to visit Get My Payment before the noon Wednesday deadline so they can provide their direct deposit information. Time is running out for a chance to get these payments several weeks earlier through direct deposit."

After noon Wednesday, the IRS will begin preparing millions of files to send to BFS for paper checks that will begin arriving through late May and into June. Taxpayers who use Get My Payment before that cut-off can still take advantage of entering direct deposit information.

How Get My Payment works

The Get My Payment tool provides eligible taxpayers with a projected Economic Impact Payment deposit date. The information is updated once daily, usually overnight. There is no need to check more than once a day. Taxpayers who did not choose direct deposit on their last tax return can use this tool to input bank account information to receive their payment by direct deposit, expediting receipt.

Non-Filers portal remains available

For those not required to file a federal tax return, the Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info Here tool helps them submit basic information to receive an Economic Impact Payment quickly to their bank account. Developed in partnership between the IRS and the Free File Alliance, this tool provides a free and easy option for those who don't receive Social Security retirement, survivor or disability benefits (SSDI), Railroad Retirement benefits, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and VA Compensation and Pension (C&P) benefits. The Non-Filers tool is also available in Spanish.

Eligible taxpayers who filed tax returns for 2019 or 2018 will receive the payments automatically. Automatic payments will also be sent to those receiving Social Security retirement, disability benefits, Railroad Retirement benefits, Veterans Affairs benefits or Supplemental Security Income soon.

Watch out for scams related to Economic Impact Payments

The IRS urges taxpayers to be on the lookout for scams related to the Economic Impact Payments. To use the new app or get information, taxpayers should visit IRS.gov. People should watch out for scams using email, phone calls or texts related to the payments. Be careful and cautious: The IRS will not send unsolicited electronic communications asking people to open attachments, visit a website or share personal or financial information.

Stay informed with Economic Impact Payment FAQs; Social Media platforms

Taxpayers should check the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for more information.

COVID-19 paid leave tax credits for small and midsize businesses

Monday, May 11, 2020

COVID Tax Tip 2020-53, May 7, 2020 From IRS.gov >

Small and midsize employers can claim two new refundable payroll tax credits. The paid sick leave credit and the paid family leave credit are designed to immediately and fully reimburse eligible employers for the cost of providing COVID-19 related leave to their employees.

Here are some key things to know about these credits.

Paid sick and family leave

For COVID-19 related reasons, employees receive up to 80 hours of paid sick leave when they are sick or caring for someone else who is, and up to 10 weeks of paid family leave when their children's schools or place of care are closed, or child care providers are unavailable due to COVID-19.

Coverage

  • Employers receive 100% reimbursement for required paid leave.
  • Health insurance costs are also included in the credit.
  • Employers do not owe their share of social security tax on the paid leave and get a credit for their share of Medicare tax on the paid leave.
  • Self-employed individuals receive an equivalent credit.

Fast funds

  • Reimbursement will be quick and easy.
  • The credit provides a dollar-for-dollar tax offset against the employer's payroll taxes
  • The IRS will send any refunds owed as quickly as possible.

To take immediate advantage of the paid leave credits, businesses should use funds they would otherwise pay to the IRS in payroll taxes. If those amounts are not enough to cover the cost of paid leave, employers can request an expedited advance from the IRS by submitting Form 7200, Advance Payment of Employer Credits Due to COVID-19.

For details about these credits and other relief, visit Coronavirus Tax Relief on IRS.gov.

IRS: Three new credits are available to many businesses hit by COVID-19

Thursday, May 07, 2020

May 7, 2020 From IRS.gov >

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today reminds employers affected by COVID-19 about three important new credits available to them.

Employee Retention Credit:

The employee retention credit is designed to encourage businesses to keep employees on their payroll. The refundable tax credit is 50% of up to $10,000 in wages paid by an eligible employer whose business has been financially impacted by COVID-19.

The credit is available to all employers regardless of size, including tax-exempt organizations. There are only two exceptions: State and local governments and their instrumentalities and small businesses who take small business loans.

Qualifying employers must fall into one of two categories:

  1. The employer's business is fully or partially suspended by government order due to COVID-19 during the calendar quarter.
  2. The employer's gross receipts are below 50% of the comparable quarter in 2019. Once the employer's gross receipts go above 80% of a comparable quarter in 2019, they no longer qualify after the end of that quarter.

Employers will calculate these measures each calendar quarter.

Paid Sick Leave Credit and Family Leave Credit:

The paid sick leave credit is designed to allow business to get a credit for an employee who is unable to work (including telework) because of Coronavirus quarantine or self-quarantine or has Coronavirus symptoms and is seeking a medical diagnosis. Those employees are entitled to paid sick leave for up to 10 days (up to 80 hours) at the employee's regular rate of pay up to $511 per day and $5,110 in total.

The employer can also receive the credit for employees who are unable to work due to caring for someone with Coronavirus or caring for a child because the child's school or place of care is closed, or the paid childcare provider is unavailable due to the Coronavirus. Those employees are entitled to paid sick leave for up to two weeks (up to 80 hours) at 2/3 the employee's regular rate of pay or, up to $200 per day and $2,000 in total.

Employees are also entitled to paid family and medical leave equal to 2/3 of the employee's regular pay, up to $200 per day and $10,000 in total. Up to 10 weeks of qualifying leave can be counted towards the family leave credit.

Employers can be immediately reimbursed for the credit by reducing their required deposits of payroll taxes that have been withheld from employees' wages by the amount of the credit.

Eligible employers are entitled to immediately receive a credit in the full amount of the required sick leave and family leave, plus related health plan expenses and the employer's share of Medicare tax on the leave, for the period of April 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020. The refundable credit is applied against certain employment taxes on wages paid to all employees.

How will employers receive the credit?

Employers can be immediately reimbursed for the credit by reducing their required deposits of payroll taxes that have been withheld from employees' wages by the amount of the credit.

Eligible employers will report their total qualified wages and the related health insurance costs for each quarter on their quarterly employment tax returns or Form 941 beginning with the second quarter. If the employer's employment tax deposits are not sufficient to cover the credit, the employer may receive an advance payment from the IRS by submitting Form 7200, Advance Payment of Employer Credits Due to COVID-19.

Eligible employers can also request an advance of the Employee Retention Credit by submitting Form 7200.

The IRS has also posted Employee Retention Credit FAQs and Paid Family Leave and Sick Leave FAQs that will help answer questions.

Updates on the implementation of the Employee Retention Credit and other information can be found on the Coronavirus page of IRS.gov.

You now have until July 15 to file and pay your taxes

Thursday, May 07, 2020

The federal income tax filing due date is extended from April 15, 2020, to July 15, 2020. You also have until July 15 to make any 2020 federal income tax payments, without penalties and interest, regardless of the amount you owe. From IRS.gov >

PPP Loan Frequently Asked Questions provided by US Treasury Department

Tuesday, May 05, 2020

PDF download of a comprehensive 15 page FAQ regarding questions about the PPP program. Download the below document to read.

PAYCHECK PROTECTION PROGRAM (PPP) FAQ's - May 3, 2020

Tax Deadline Extension Information

Friday, April 03, 2020

The 2019 income tax filing and payment deadlines for all taxpayers who file and pay their Federal income taxes on April 15, 2020, are automatically extended until July 15, 2020. This relief applies to all individual returns, trusts, and corporations. This relief is automatic, taxpayers do not need to file any additional forms or call the IRS to qualify.

This relief also includes estimated tax payments for tax year 2020 that are due on April 15, 2020.

Penalties and interest will begin to accrue on any remaining unpaid balances as of July 16, 2020. You will automatically avoid interest and penalties on the taxes paid by July 15.

Individual taxpayers who need additional time to file beyond the July 15 deadline can request a filing extension by filing Form 4868 through their tax professional, tax software or using the Free File link on IRS.gov. Businesses who need additional time must file Form 7004.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Resources

Friday, April 03, 2020

SMALL BUSINESS PAYCHECK PROTECTION PROGRAM

The Paycheck Protection Program provides small businesses with funds to pay up to 8 weeks of payroll costs including benefits. Funds can also be used to pay interest on mortgages, rent, and utilities.


PAYCHECK PROTECTION PROGRAM (PPP) INFORMATION SHEET: BORROWERS

The Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) authorizes up to $349 billion in forgivable loans to small businesses to pay their employees during the COVID-19 crisis. All loan terms will be the same for everyone. Download for more information.


PAYCHECK PROTECTION PROGRAM APPLICATION FORM (updated April 3, 2020)


Download PPP Application Form


Important Information from Quickbooks